Community

Grade 4 students fringe blankets.Grade 4 students fringe blankets.On Feb. 1, the fourth grade class at Temple Sinai participated in Project Linus. The project was organized through a joint effort of the congregation’s Sisterhood and the Social Action Committee.

Project Linus is a national organization with local chapters in all 50 states. Volunteers make blankets that are collected locally and then distributed to children in hospitals, shelters, social service agencies or anywhere that a child might be in need of a big hug.

Everybody has a hero. And the David C. Isenberg Family Early Childhood Center is no different. These ECC heroes share a vision for excellence in early childhood education.

Plans are underway to honor two heroes, David C. Isenberg and Judy Ellen Nagle, on March 29. The evening will include dinner, dancing to live music and an auction. Isenberg is being recognized for his commitment, dedication and philanthropy. Nagle is being honored for 25 years of teaching. The goal of the evening is to raise $18,000 to dedicate Nagle’s preschool classroom in her honor.

Shabbat across America will take on a global perspective in New Bedford when Rabbi Michael Schudrich, chief rabbi of Poland, speaks at Tifereth Israel Congregation March 13 and 14.

Chief rabbi of Poland since 2004, Schudrich served as rabbi of Warsaw and Lodz before that, beginning in 2000. During his time in Poland he has been a part of rebuilding Jewish life in that country which had a large, thriving community before the Holocaust.

Gathered at the installation are (left to right): Lorraine Rappaport, Ronnie Sirotta, Judy Schoenfeld, Jane Kondon, Sue Mayes, Judy Silverman, Linda Flescher, Leah Ross-Coke /PHOTO | RI HADASSAHGathered at the installation are (left to right): Lorraine Rappaport, Ronnie Sirotta, Judy Schoenfeld, Jane Kondon, Sue Mayes, Judy Silverman, Linda Flescher, Leah Ross-Coke /PHOTO | RI HADASSAHOn Dec. 9, 2014, the Rhode Island chapter of Hadassah installed a new group of officers. The program began with a look back at the many contributions the organization has made in areas such as health information, hospital programming, education and youth programming through youth aliyah.

 

Ask any child what the best time of year is, and he will say summertime. For many, summer means spending time outdoors, and across North America hundreds of thousands of kids will do so at camp.  Over 75,000 of them will attend a nonprofit Jewish overnight camp. For these kids, Jewish camp is just plain fun, but it’s really much more than that – it’s camp with a soul.  While they are racing down the zipline, singing under the stars, and making lifelong friends they also learn values like self-confidence, independence, and leadership that stay with them long after the last campfire of the summer.  At Jewish camp, campers explore their connection to Judaism in a fun and meaningful way while having the time of their lives.