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Welcome to the 21st century, where everything is virtualized, digitized and influenced by social media. One such social-media site, Pinterest, has become known as “the way of the wedding planning future” because it allows customers and vendors to have a clear, visual conversation about their wedding vision, style and execution.

On Pinterest, users create boards, and “pin” ideas to those boards. Imagine, for example, that you have a Pinterest board dedicated to bridal hairstyles. Every hairstyle you find that you like, you pin to that board. Now imagine that everyone in the world can copy those hairstyles, and pin them to their own boards – and everyone can see those boards. That’s what happens on Pinterest, which is why many brides-to-be have embraced it as a place to find ideas from around the world.

A romantic, traditional Victorian wedding bouquet of blush and white garden roses by Pam Hargraves of Blooming Blossoms. /photo | Sara Zarrella PhotographyA romantic, traditional Victorian wedding bouquet of blush and white garden roses by Pam Hargraves of Blooming Blossoms. /photo | Sara Zarrella PhotographyThis year has seen a couple of trends emerge in the wedding floral industry. Most brides are looking for less structured, more natural arrangements with a pop of color.

Bridal bouquets commonly represent a bride’s style and personality, which will set the tone for the rest of the wedding. There are many different shapes of bouquets including traditional Victorian, round, teardrop, cascade and wildflower. In the past few years, brides have tended to prefer all white bridal flowers, which are most commonly used in traditional and round bouquets.

LOS ANGELES (JTA) – For the last three years, I’ve celebrated Tu b’Shevat – the Jewish New Year of the Trees – by organizing a participatory seder in a nearby canyon-top park.

The seder usually includes about 10 to 15 people from my group, the Movable Minyan – a small, lay-led, independent congregation that needs every member’s active participation in order to thrive. We meet in the parking lot, and from there, bags of seder supplies in hand, we take a short hike up past oak trees to a chaparral-covered hill with a panoramic view of the San Fernando Valley.

Benjamin Levine works on sukkah decorations for the sukkah at Tamarisk. /WBCJCBenjamin Levine works on sukkah decorations for the sukkah at Tamarisk. /WBCJCFamilies today face many demands, difficult choices and sacrifices, but finding community, practicing your Jewish faith and educating your children about Judaism shouldn’t be among them. The West Bay Community Jewish Center, in Coventry, strives to make religious school an easier fit for both parents and their children.

Through the years, Principal Susan Sugarman has noticed that fewer and fewer students were attending the second day of religious school, largely due to the time constraints on busy young families. Sugarman and Rabbi Richard Perlman responded by creating a new model that condenses the curriculum into a single weekly class, held on Sunday mornings.

A photo from the exhibit at Brown RISD gallery. /Brown RISD HillelA photo from the exhibit at Brown RISD gallery. /Brown RISD HillelBrown RISD Hillel is exhibiting Rudi Weissenstein’s historic photographs of Israel in the gallery through Feb. 15.

Weissenstein’s work comes from The PhotoHouse, the oldest photography shop in Israel. The shop was established in 1936 in the heart of Tel Aviv by the photographer Rudi Weissenstein and his wife Miriam, and has become one of Israel’s largest and most valuable private archives of historical photographs.