Community

I have had the opportunity on several occasions to engage in a discussion on aging with groups of individuals of various ages. When asked what comes to mind when they think about older adults, a number of unflattering words are usually mentioned such as frail, forgetful, slow, failing, demented and disabled.

Adolescents were generally serious and pensive with their considerations of these words. Adults, particularly those who were middle-aged or older, were often good-humored with their deliberations. However, author Robert J. Sternberg in his article “Older But Not Wiser? The Relationship Between Age and Wisdom,” indicated that when people were asked to name individuals who they thought were wise, older people such as Mother Theresa, Confucius, Socrates, Queen Elizabeth and the pope were referenced repeatedly. Fortunately, Sternberg’s exercise clearly supports the idea that many believe older people are indeed wiser despite the stereotypical descriptions used by the people to whom I have spoken.

While temporarily living in Bremerhaven during the autumn of 1960, my husband Everett and I realized that the Rosh Hashanah holy days would soon be approaching. Our concern was, where do we spend Yom Kippur as we found out that there were no synagogues in Bremerhaven. We asked several of our neighbors living in the American Government Complex, and they all suggested that we go to Hamburg, which wasn’t too far away. So we booked our train reservations for the morning of Kol Nidre, and we were off to spend the Holy Day in Hamburg. 

Longtime JDC leader Ralph Goldman dies at 100 /JDCLongtime JDC leader Ralph Goldman dies at 100 /JDCJTA – Most Jews have never heard of, let alone ever met, Ralph I. Goldman.

But for countless numbers of us throughout the world, Ralph – a former chief executive of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) – played a role in our freedom, our positive Jewish identity, our dedication to the neediest among us. He was also instrumental in the State of Israel’s birth, its growth and success, its cultural and educational institutions, and its strong social fabric.

Indeed, he was one of the greatest advocates for the Jewish people and Israel, their constant companion in times of need, and their warmest compatriot in times of elation.

JTA — A highway expansion project in Israel has led to the discovery of a nearly 2,000-year-old mikveh.

The ritual bath was discovered at Ha-Ela Junction, near the city of Beit Shemesh, during archaeological excavations conducted prior to widening Highway 38, the Israel Antiquities Authority said in a news release.

In addition to the 1,900-year-old mikveh, archaeologists discovered fragments of pottery vessels and a large 1,700-year-old water cistern whose ceiling bore graffiti engraved by two World War II-era Australian soldiers.

Assaf Peretz, an archaeologist and historian with the Israel Antiquities Authority, said the soldiers left their names – Cpl. Phillip William Scarlett and Patrick Raphael Walsh –  serial numbers and the date, May 30, 1940. They belonged to a division that was stationed in prestate Israel during the British Mandate and training for combat in France, but France surrendered before the troops were ready and the soldiers were ultimately sent to Egypt in October 1940.

Peter Tedeschi, left, as Alfred P. Doolittle performs “With a Little Bit of Luck” with Harry and Jamie portrayed by Jonathan Olivera and Daniel Larson in Lerner and Loewe’s Broadway classic, “My Fair Lady,” being presented at Ocean State Theatre in Warwick through Oct. 19. /PHOTO | MARK TUREKPeter Tedeschi, left, as Alfred P. Doolittle performs “With a Little Bit of Luck” with Harry and Jamie portrayed by Jonathan Olivera and Daniel Larson in Lerner and Loewe’s Broadway classic, “My Fair Lady,” being presented at Ocean State Theatre in Warwick through Oct. 19. /PHOTO | MARK TUREKWARWICK – Former Woonsocket resident and member of Congregation B’nai Israel is back in Rhode Island to perform onstage as Alfred P. Doolittle in Ocean State Theatre’s production of “My Fair Lady.” Since leaving Woonsocket to pursue a journalism career, Peter Tedeschi is returning to his birth state to perform for the first time after a decade of success in the theater.

Upon graduating from Marquette University, Tedeschi quickly climbed the ranks as a producer and freelance journalist for CNN. His career there included working on the “Larry King Live” show. He developed and was the executive producer of Noticiero CNN, which later became CNN en Espanol. He also served as the senior executive producer for CNN Financial News. However, he soon discovered that his true passion was on the stage.