Community

The Narraganset Bay Symphony  Community Orchestra after their last performance.The Narraganset Bay Symphony Community Orchestra after their last performance.Many of us are passionate about our craft, but musicians are some of the luckiest people because they are entirely enchanted by their noble pursuit. The members of the Narragansett Bay Symphony Community Orchestra have chosen a field that evokes much pleasure, which they would like to share with you, their audience. The community-based orchestra is excited to perform “French Impression” on March 8 at 3 p.m. at the Dwares JCC.

 

February activities included baking, above, and a trip to play Laser Tag.February activities included baking, above, and a trip to play Laser Tag.It has been very active in our new and improved Teen Lounge. Our Nintendo Wii is a huge hit with the teens competing against one another in all things Wii sports. The other big competition among our teens is at our Foosball table. The teens here at the Dwares JCC are really getting into challenging one another and keeping their winning streak alive!

 

Paula Visnoski, “Amur Leopard” a watercolor  from the Endangered Wildlife seriesPaula Visnoski, “Amur Leopard” a watercolor from the Endangered Wildlife seriesThe March/April show in the Gallery at Temple Habonim features works by two noted artists who work in very different styles.

Paula Visnoski, an award-winning artist, shows her versatility in her many mediums — watercolor, oil, graphic design, photography.  “Like the weather in New England, I am always changing,”  she says. Her work incorporates symbolism, imagery and a “oneness with the earth and all living things.”  In her words, “my art helps me to release what my ‘mind’s eye’ is experiencing.” 

“Hineni (Here I Am),” is a limited edition lithograph by Naomi Geller Lipsky, a longtime member of the American Guild of Judaic Art. /COURTESY | NAOMI GELLER LIPSKY“Hineni (Here I Am),” is a limited edition lithograph by Naomi Geller Lipsky, a longtime member of the American Guild of Judaic Art. /COURTESY | NAOMI GELLER LIPSKYJewish Arts Month, an annual educational initiative sponsored by the American Guild of Judaic Art, takes place in  March. Activities aim to promote a greater appreciation and understanding of the special significance of contemporary Judaica, Jewish art, and the meaning behind the Torah commandment, Hiddur Mitzvah, to beautify ritual objects or art for one’s home, the synagogue, a Jewish Community Center or similar institutions.

Imagine a visit to Paris, France in 1894, the most exciting city in Europe, with dozens of new galleries to see, new music halls to visit, and a great new steel tower to climb. Paris: a wealthy city in a glorious republic that gave liberty, equality and fraternity to all citizens, including shopkeepers, laborers, ordinary soldiers and Jews. But if you visited Paris in November of 1894, you would have witnessed a roiling national crisis, prompted by the latest news: Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a young French artillery officer and a Jew who had been accused of passing military secrets to Germany, was found guilty and banished to Devil’s Island, forever.