Community

More than 75 people attended a Yom Ha’Zikaron event at the Dwares JCC April 21 that included a solemn ceremony and a discussion by a panel of community members who have served in the IDF. Organized by Israeli Shaliach Gilor Meshulam, who served in the IDF, those who attended could take candles with a QR code that would take them to an online message about a fallen Israeli soldier. The evening included song and prayer.More than 75 people attended a Yom Ha’Zikaron event at the Dwares JCC April 21 that included a solemn ceremony and a discussion by a panel of community members who have served in the IDF. Organized by Israeli Shaliach Gilor Meshulam, who served in the IDF, those who attended could take candles with a QR code that would take them to an online message about a fallen Israeli soldier. The evening included song and prayer.Last year, on Yom Ha’Zikaron, (Israel’s National Remembrance Day), I was in Jerusalem. This day occurs one day before Israel’s Independence Day, or Yom Ha’Atzmaut.

Remembrance Day is a very solemn occasion in Israel because it memorializes  all those who have fallen in wars to defend the State of Israel. The whole country is in mourning and all radio and television stations continually broadcast biographies and names of fallen heroes, who have lost their lives defending their homeland.

Since Israel is a small country, almost every family has been touched by this terrible tragedy such as the loss of a child, father, husband or a friend in battle to protect the land of Israel or in the many terrorist attacks. Therefore the sorrow of the day is felt by everyone.

Israel is a place that never forgets its heroes, martyrs and fallen soldiers.  During the War of Independence in 1948, many of the soldiers who fought in the fledgling Israeli army were young Holocaust survivors who arrived in the new land as orphans without any family.

Gloria Brody and William CrausmanGloria Brody and William CrausmanThis spring marks two anniversaries in the history of United Brothers Synagogue. Not only will the Bristol landmark be celebrating the 115th anniversary of its original founding (1900), but it will mark the 40th anniversary of its “re-founding.” In the mid-1960s, the number of members had dwindled to the point that the location at 205 High St. was no longer used for religious services. The building, however, was not sold and, thanks to the care of the Leviten family, it was never allowed to fall into disrepair. In February of 1975, after a decade of inactivity, a determined group of nine Bristolians met to explore the possibility of revitalizing the synagogue. Present were Alton and Gloria Brody, Nancy Hillman, William Hillman, Eleanor Radin, Lena and David Leviten, Maynard Shusman and Steven Roth.

 

Rabbi Marc S. Jagolinzer has served as spiritual leader of Temple Shalom in Middletown for 40 years. He has touched the lives of hundreds of people throughout the Jewish and general Rhode Island communities.  To mark this milestone occasion, Temple Shalom will honor him the weekend of June 5-7, with special Shabbat services and a celebration dinner with entertainment.  Services will be held at Temple Shalom on June 5 at 7:30 p.m. and June 6 at 10 a.m. The dinner will be held June 7 at 6 p.m. at the Atlantic Beach Club in Middletown.  The rabbi also will be presented with a testimonial book of personal messages and memories.  All are welcome to share in these celebrations. 

On May 29, Temple Beth-El will kick-off a celebratory weekend, honoring Rabbi Leslie Yale Gutterman’s 45 years of service at Temple Beth-El and his transition to Senior Rabbi Emeritus status in July.

The inaugural event will be a 7 p.m. Shabbat service led by Gutterman’s Temple Beth-El clergy colleagues, Rabbi Sarah Mack and Cantor Judy Seplowin, who will be joined on the bimah by his daughters, Rabbi Rebecca Gutterman, currently rabbi at Congregation B’nai Tikvah in Walnut Creek, California, and Elizabeth Gutterman of Boston. The service will be followed by a festive Oneg Shabbat. Both the service and the Oneg are open to the community.

Grades 6-7 at the maror, korech and shulchan orech station with Rabbi Philmus. /DORI ADLERGrades 6-7 at the maror, korech and shulchan orech station with Rabbi Philmus. /DORI ADLERStudents at Temple Torat Yisrael’s Cohen School had an exciting time on March 29 participating in “Leaving Egypt” Passover program. The program offered an engaging and meaningful approach to fulfilling the commandment to remember and tell the story of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt from generation to generation.

Teachers and parent volunteers facilitated this experiential program during which the students participated in hands-on activities that engaged all of their senses and allowed them to make a personal connection to the Passover Seder and the story of our exodus from Egypt. The students were able to touch, hear, smell and see the wonderful experiences of the holiday of Passover. Each station was researched and designed as a sensory way to experience the Seder steps with their teachers and student body.

The groups, separated by classes, were assigned a tribe of Israel (Benyamin, Naftali, Dan, Judah and Levi) and were provided with a map of the Seder steps. They were then sent on a journey to freedom.

At the first station, students drank juice for kiddush, washed their hands for ur’chatz, and dipped their karpas in saltwater.