Community

Rosh Hodesh event committee, left to right, Kit Haspel, Sherry Cohen, Cheryl Greenfeld Teverow, Maybeth Lichaa, Marcia Hirsch, Toby London, Barbara Sheer with guest, Rabbi Elan Babchuck.Rosh Hodesh event committee, left to right, Kit Haspel, Sherry Cohen, Cheryl Greenfeld Teverow, Maybeth Lichaa, Marcia Hirsch, Toby London, Barbara Sheer with guest, Rabbi Elan Babchuck.On Oct. 28, more than 50 community members gathered at Temple Emanu-El for a Women’s Alliance Rosh Hodesh luncheon presentation by Rabbi Elan Babchuck. The topic was timeless and universal: how is happiness defined today and how has it been defined throughout history.

Cheryl Greenfeld Teverow, chair of the Rosh Hodesh series, welcomed the audience with poignant reminders of the essential and far-reaching impact of giving to the Alliance Annual Campaign. The funds raised through the campaign each year support overseas and local needs such as providing quality programs and imperative social services developed and operated by Jewish Family Service for those seeking mental health and emotional wellness counseling. These reminders were particularly touching given the topic at hand.

The group from 2014: Top row, left to right:  Barbara Fields, Deborah Kutenplon,  Alison Walter, Tara Demyan, Elissa Felder, Meryle Cawley, Tichyeh Schochet.  Bottom row, left to right: Jill Pearlman, Laurie Tessier, Julie Bromberg. /Elissa FelderThe group from 2014: Top row, left to right:  Barbara Fields, Deborah Kutenplon, Alison Walter, Tara Demyan, Elissa Felder, Meryle Cawley, Tichyeh Schochet. Bottom row, left to right: Jill Pearlman, Laurie Tessier, Julie Bromberg. /Elissa FelderIn 2008, eight Jewish women from different walks of life, affiliations, observance and ages began a powerful dialogue. They agreed that it was time to empower and inspire women with the rich beauty of their Jewish heritage, and the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project (JWRP) was born.

The JWRP seeks to inspire women to transform themselves, transform their families, their communities and the world. The flagship program is Momentum, an eight-day journey through Israel. According to JWRP, Momentum is more than a tour of Israel; it is an opportunity to deeply explore yourself. Thousands of women from 19 different countries have already experienced this life-changing trip, paying only their own airfare, and returning home with a new perspective – a deep, eternal connection to Israel, a profound kinship with each other and a heart filled with Jewish values.

Richard Jacobs, “Christmas Day, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia”Richard Jacobs, “Christmas Day, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia”The November/December show in the Gallery at Temple Habonim features works by three artists.

Felicia Touhey, encaustic painter and printmaker, uses materials, process and manipulation in her creations. Her inspiration is nature – its lines, shapes, light and color.

Brian Larkin, artist, musician and historian, has perfected the white (or black) line woodblock printing technique used by Provincetown artists in the early 20th century. His work masterfully uses line and color but also captures his sense of humor.

Richard Jacobs has a passion for travel, principally to obscure and lesser-visited places. He is wont to quote Susan Sontag: “I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on the list.”

The exhibit is on view through Jan. 8. The Gallery at Temple Habonim is at 165 New Meadow Road in Barrington. Gallery hours are Wednesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fridays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and by appointment. For information, call 401-245-6536 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Tara DemyanTara DemyanTara Demyan’s trip to Israel this summer was an eye opener.

From the moment of arrival in Israel, as part of a group of 10 women from the Providence area, “I fell in love with Israel,” she says.

The group joined 200 other women in the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project’s summer 2014 trip. They arrived in Israel in the midst of the search for the three kidnapped yeshiva students. Dinner the first night was interrupted by the news of the discovery of the students’ bodies.

The remainder of the trip went on as planned but the news affected the women, all mothers, profoundly. “You could feel the sorrow in the room” that first night, said Demyan.

The Touro Guards, 1898, offered their services during the Spanish-American War.The Touro Guards, 1898, offered their services during the Spanish-American War.In elementary school we learned that Nov. 11 was called Armistice Day, the day when hostilities ceased in World War I. At ceremonies commemorating that event and those who fought and died in “the war to end all wars,” we recited – by heart – the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae.

The aftermath of World War I did not bring the peace for which we all yearned. In 1954, Nov. 11 became Veterans Day, a day dedicated to the veterans of wars this country has fought in faraway places and closer to home. In this spirit of remembrance, the names of Jewish veterans with ties to Rhode Island are engraved in the Jewish War Veterans Wall of Honor at Lincoln Park Cemetery. Most of these men and women served during the 20th century, but we also have a history of volunteers who joined the army to fight the Spanish in Cuba.